Detroit

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I went to an advanced moving screening of Detroit, and what a privilege that was. Detroit the movie is a beautiful tragedy. I found beauty in how well crafted the film was. Variations of real footage and actual footage of the Detroit riots were captivating. It started with a description of the Great Migration, using images of Jacob Lawrences artwork. Jacob Lawrence is a famous African-American artist who captured the plight of the Great Migration through his art. They literally made his art come to life, which was fascinating to see.

The beginning of the movie takes us into the commencement of the Detroit Riots, which was triggered at a party on 12th Street. The Detroit Riots was one of the main character of this film. Eventually we meet, the antagonistic police of Detroit, and something about their behavior seems eerily similar to our current issues with police today.

The protagonists of the film Larry and Fred appear about 20-minutes in, at the Fox Theater during a performance. The Dramatics (the group that Larry was in), was just about to take the stage before the police came to evacuate the venue. If you know anything about music of the past, The Dramatics eventually blew up in the 70s but this was 1967, right before their rise to fame and they were still hungry little teens looking to be the next Temptations.

What happens after the performance at the Algiers Hotel is the tragedy. Three innocent teens dead at the hands of police officers. I will leave it up to you to see this film and come to your own conclusions about this horrific occurrence that’s been left out of far too many history books. This film is a must see, and I encourage you all to brace yourselves!

If Issa Was My Friend…Insecure Season 2 Episode 2

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Photo Cred: Hiddenremote.com

If Issa was my friend I would’ve been right there with her checking out Tasha’s social media account. I know, the mature thing to do is to avoid social media stalking “the new girl” all together but when the love of your life just broke up with you and has a new chick, maturity goes out of the window. Is this healthy? Absolutely not. Does she run the risk of becoming obsessed with looking at Tasha’s page, yep! Will she spend many nights on the couch comparing herself to Tasha? Pretty much! But sometimes, seeing that your ex has moved on finally opens up the door for closure. The first picture of them together is going to hurt like a dagger. The first time she questions, “What does he see in her, that he didn’t see in me?” will be emotionally draining but these are often times the emotions one has to go through after a break up, especially when an ex has moved on and you haven’t. I’ve been there. Something about stalking the new girl makes you feel kind of low though. You’re sitting here obsessing over someone else, while they’re out there living their best life and with your man…think about it.

Issa learned tragically that there’s no chance of Lawrence coming back (Molly, thanks for being #bestfriendgoals and camping outside his job, you’re the real MVP). Although I’m 89% sure Lawrence will be back, Issa seems like she’s coming into terms with this, despite how hard it may be.

The person who really needs advice in this episode is Tasha. She’s the rebound girl. The girl who wants to be loved so bad, that she’ll settle for someone else’s leftovers; Dangerous position to be in.

If Tasha was my friend, I would tell her “Run fast! I know you’re catching feelings girl, but Lawrence is confused and you have to protect your heart….He’s honest though.”

I’ve never seen any man feel so guilty about sleeping with their ex, that they confess their wrongs to the rebound girl. I’m hoping fellas take note. Honesty is the best policy, even if it stings at first. At the end of the day, no matter what position you might be playing, main chick or rebound, we’re all human and we all have feelings and a strong desire to be loved. I believe most women would prefer a guy being honest about his mistakes than finding out about it; that type of betrayal hurts bad. Again, Lawrence is showing his self-righteousness, by proving he can be better than Issa. Issa wasn’t honest with him, but he has to be better than her, or that would make him just as guilty. But it leads me to question if Lawrence was only being honest because Tasha and him are not exclusive, so it’s less pressure. Nevertheless, Lawrence needs some breathing space. I would be shocked if Lawrence and Tasha became exclusive because right now Tasha is looking like collateral damage and no one deserves that.

If Issa Was My Friend… Insecure Season 2 Epi. 1

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Photo Cred: The Atlantic

The season 2 premiere of Insecure was like soul food. Issa’s character awkwardly over thinks herself into crazy situations, setting her expectations high and leaving her disappointed, similar to what I do on a daily basis, especially when it comes to my love life. As the twists and turns of the episode unfolded, I found myself shaking my head and screaming at the screen “No Girl.” Not from a place of judgment but from a place of understanding. Been there and done all of that.

Thus, If Issa was my friend, was born. Unlike a recap of the episode (which is great, but there’s tons of those already), my Iyanla senses wants me to get to the root of Issa and Molly’s decisions this season. I want to be apart of their friend circle anyway, so this is kind of me bringing the idea of having a best friend in my head to life. See how that works?

If Issa was my friend, I would’ve told her, “No! Don’t have sex with Lawrence. They always come back but that doesn’t mean you should give up the goodies as soon as they do. He’s just not ready.”

Breakups are rough, especially when the woman is the one who cheated and is at fault for it. Some guys in these situations, develop these self-righteous attitudes, like they are so much better than the cheating woman. They act as if they are so disgusted by the presence of this woman. Even if the guy wasn’t so innocent in the relationship himself, something happens to his ego when a woman cheats and he pretty much changes.

This is what we are seeing happening to Lawrence. Lawrence loved Issa but now that Issa betrayed his trust, he’s unforgiving. My only issue with this, is societal double standards that are in favor of men when they cheat but not when women do. When a man cheats, the woman is supposed to forgive and get over it. Which in most cases we usually do. Society tells us to accept the reality of a cheating man because “ALL MEN CHEAT.” Whether that is true or not, we have desensitized cheating for men, but have not done the same for women. When a woman cheats, the consequences are grim. The men in these situations are not as forgiving and they are conditioned to walk away from the situation without any chance of reconciliation . Lawrence first instincts wasn’t to forgive Issa, it was to hurt her as much as she hurt him. It was to sleep with other women. Not once was it to hear Issa’s pleas of forgiveness. I am not condoning cheating for men or women, but I think the standards for each gender should be equal.

Issa created an awesome plan to show Lawrence that she’s living her best life by throwing a Wine Down party. She thought he was coming over but he in turn sends that disappointing text that he wasn’t going to make it. The feeling of defeat on her face was a little sad. Getting disappointed by an ex that you love and so desperately want to make amends with is always rough. But he eventually came around.

What we saw happen on that couch was not an act of love. That was a quick F***. Let’s not get it twisted. Issa opened a door for a friends with benefits situation. Lawrence and Issa are not back together, just yet. Lawrence is not looking at her in a loving way, although he still has love for her. She’s a sexual object now, a release for his pent up anger and that kiss on the cheek at the end was a slap in the face. I know we’re supposed to believe that he’s coming back. I know that cringe worthy smirk on Issa’s face at the end of the episode, means that even she thinks he’s coming back, but he’s not. Not yet. He’s hurt, his ego is bruised, and he still has to unpack some of those feelings. Sometimes men jump to other women to deal with that type of hurt. Lawrence is now with Tasha who seems to uplift him, despite her messing with the chances of him and Issa getting back together. Issa however is going to have to figure out how to live life without Lawrence in the mean time and iron out all of her issues so when Lawrence does finally come back, which he will, she’s ready for the relationship that they both deserve. If she still even wants that.

UndergroundWGN is #Winning

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“It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others…one ever feels his twoness-an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings, two warrings ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torun asunder. ” – W.E.B Dubois

UndergroundWGN is Emmy worthy and I can’t wait to see how successful it becomes. Underground follows Noah, a slave on a plantation, who seeks freedom through the Underground Railroad. He realizes, that his goal may only be possible if he assembles a group of his fellow slaves to accompany him.Of course the show gets way more complicated than that, but that’s the general concept.

Double Consciousness

 Double consciousness or shifting among the characters is extremely prevalent, which is one of the reasons I watch the show religiously. I am intrigued by the writers use of this idea coined by W.E.B Dubois way back in 1903 in his book The Soul of Black Folks. Double Consciousness, is basically in layman terms the two faces black people put on in America. We have to be black, and we have to be American. We have to act one way among white people and another way when we are comfortable enough being our true selves. Essentially we have to shift to survive.

Spoiler Alert

Each of the characters in this show shift or have two-faces. You think you know who they really are at their core, but each week, something new is exposed and another layer is added to them. Right now, we know that Noah played by Aldis Hodge has a limp because he doesn’t want the plantation owners to know that he is a threat to them. We know that Rosalee played by Jurnee Smollett-Bell  is a contented house-slave, who is ready to run away by any means. We also know that August Pullman played by Christopher Meloni is a white slave catcher who pretends to be for black people but will turn them in for a cash reward instantly. There’s a lot of shifting going on as a means of survival and I am here for it all.

Why you should watch

If I can compare this show to anything else, I would say it’s like a Scandal, set in slavery times. The writers are superb. They keep me engaged and wanting more and although this is sensitive material, they find a balance and create some highs and lows in the episodes so you’re not emotionally drained by the conclusion. Sometimes I find myself so drawn into the story lines, I have dreams about it later on.

I know why people might want to avoid a show like this; who wants to be constantly reminded about slavery every  week? I thought the same thing initially, but these characters are humanized in this show, even though the actual system of slavery  dehumanize them. They have feelings, and dreams just like anyone else, which is the underlying theme.Also, we have to support these shows so it can open doors for more shows to educate and acknowledge our rich stories.  I am hooked and you should be to.Underground comes on every Wednesday at 10PM (EST) on WGN which is on Channel 82 if you have Cablevision. WGN is a relatively new network so don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of it before. Since the show has so many twist and turns every Wednesday the cast does a twitter chat #UndergroundWGN which is awesome because you need someone to watch this show with just so you can say “Did you see that?”

You can catch up on this series by clicking the link and watching it online. Trust me, you will thank me later.

http://www.wgnamerica.com/series/underground

Black-ish confronts Police Brutality and I’m here for it

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I am not an avid fan of Black-ish on ABC, although after the episode that just premiered I want to be. Black Lives Matter and Police Brutality have been the top stories on the news lately. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Sean Bell, Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Freddie Gray and the list goes on, were all killed at the hands of police officers. When will it end? Why are innocent lives being taken by the very authority figures that are supposed to protect those lives? What adds more fuel to the fire is that these officers are taking lives without any repercussion. Nothing is happening to them. They are completely protected under the law. It feels like we are living in 1950’s Jim Crow South where you can take the life of a black man or woman and walk away free of criminal punishment. Like I said my biggest problem with these cases are these officers facing no sort of punishment. No burn. Not a suspension, not a mandate for community service, not 2-weeks in jail, not 2-years in jail, notice I am trying to list the minimum amount of punishment to be received and they receive nothing. They are completely allowed to move on with their lives while the families of these dead victims suffer. Black Lives Matter and this has got to stop.

I say this all to say that I am a personal believer in people using their platforms to address these issues. I am proud of Black-ish for using it’s platform to illustrate the reality of how black families react every time the justice system that is supposed to protect us, fails us. This episode was so multifaceted and the writers used each of the characters to share a different perspective on this issue of police brutality. Bow and Dre struggle with how to explain to their two young children what the state of America is, without taking away their innocence. Bow wants to protect them from the reality of being black in America, while Dre wants to expose this reality to them so they have no surprises later on. Hence, the dispute of the episode is unleashed. What comes out of this episode, is great conversation and dialogue, discussions about Ta-Neshi Coates book which is taking the world by storm, and real life, tear jerking reactions to how devastating it is every time a police officer walks away Scott Free after killing a black teen or adult. The best part about the episode was that the writers were able to mix humor with real life stuff which made it one of the best television experiences I’ve had in a long time.

Without giving too much away, I encourage you guys to watch the episode. I found it on Hulu.

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Movie Monday: Lee Daniels The Butler

z6-shoji-butler-interview-a-20140214.jpgThese are our stories. OUR stories. The Butler is based on a true story of the life of Eugene Allen who was a butler for over 30-years in the White House. This movie resonated with me from the opening scene. The scene is deep although not based on Eugene Allen’s real life. A young Cecil Gaines, his mother, played by Mariah Carey, and his father played by David Banner are taking a picture on the cotton fields of the deep south when suddenly his mother is raped by an overseer. Cecil encourages his father to speak up on his mother’s behalf. His father tries to address the rape but is shot dead on the spot by the crazed overseer in front of his young son. This scene illustrates so many things but what rings out to me most is the dehumanization of black lives. Our lives meant nothing back then and it hurt watching.

Ultimately Cecil’s mother goes crazy and Cecil is taken in by the Madame to be a house boy/ house slave, which sets the tone for his career. Cecil works hard and eventually lands a job in the White House as a butler, which he takes very seriously. Simultaneously he juggles being a husband and a father to his two young sons. One of his sons being a revolutionary who is deeply apart of the struggle for Civil Rights, a far cry from  Cecil’s temperament.

This movie tugged on my heartstrings for many reasons. For one, it does a great job with representing the times and the tones of the day, from Emmett Till’s death to the Civil Rights Movement, to the Black Panthers Movement, to the Apartheid struggle in South Africa, and it does it so well. Secondly, one of the most defining moments for me in the movie was Cecil finally coming into consciousness. He realized that after years of playing the “contented negro” he deserved more for his life and he needed to fight for it. This movie resonated with me in my own life. Never be afraid to demand what you want and never settle for a situation that you know you deserve more for. Always strive to be your very best self but also remain humble. Cecil was a humble and a hard working man and I admire his work ethic and his contribution. He broke barriers and paved the way for us which is a powerful thing.

This movie is currently playing on Netflix which is where I watched it if interested.

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Confronting My History

This is what happened when I decided to confront my history in one day.

January 18th 2016

Martin Luther King Jr. Day, I had the day off and decided I wanted to watch all the black historical films that I’ve been avoiding since 2012.

First, let me explain my avoidance. These films as a black person are just hard to watch. They are completely necessary to watch but hard nonetheless. I take on the emotional burdens of these historical films depicting Slavery or the Civil Rights Movement. My mind does not allow me to separate between this being a movie, made by Hollywood, from the fact that this Hollywood made movie is a depiction of actual events and occurrences that took place in the past and so I watch these films as if these movies are real and I am  emotionally burdened by it all.

In spite of this, I just decided I wanted to be radical and not just watch one of these movies but all of them in one sitting. I wanted to watch D’Jango Unchained, 12-Years A Slave, The Butler, and Selma (if I had time, I would throw in the Malcom X movie). I dived headfirst. I started with Selma because it was MLK Day. Selma had a few rough scenes that shook me to my core and made me cry. The police ruthless beatings with the batons, the violence, the hatred, the disrespect, it messed with me but I kept on going.

Next up, I tried to find 12-Years A Slave. I couldn’t find it on Hulu or Netflix. My friends later told me, God spared my mind because that movie is a hard one. One day I will come back to it.

Then I watched D’Jango which was interesting. I liked it. It showed a black man empowered during slavery even though he was a murderer…hmm. What I hated most about this movie was the dog scene where a runaway slave was torn apart by dogs. This was a practice of slave masters during slavery, it just hurt so bad to watch.

The Butler, was next on my list. I was surprised by how great this movie was. It’s really powerful. The opening scene is a tearjerker. The rape and murder of Cecil Gaines parents illustrates how dehumanized black lives were during this time. Cecil Gaines worked hard and made his way into the White House, but he resented his eldest son who was a part of the struggle. His son was apart of the civil rights movement, the freedom rides, the Black Panther movement, and the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa. These historical references added so much substance to the movie and illustrated just how challenging the times were. Certain parts of this movie hurt to watch. Cecil constantly fought to get paid equally as the other white butlers and was shut down and told he could quit. His work as a domestic although underestimated and looked upon as “uncle tom’ish” made a huge contribution to the plight of our race and I thank him for his work and the work of many black domestics of our times just trying to make a living for their families.

January 19th 2016

By the time I watched all three of these movies I was emotionally beat. I tried to go to sleep but I couldn’t. Continue reading “Confronting My History”

Movie Monday: Selma

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Ava DuVernay! You did great work with this movie. The first 10-minutes captivated me. You see a well-dressed Martin uncomfortably receiving a Nobel Peace Prize award, but what comes next sets the tone for the whole movie. We are not sugar coating anything with this film are we? Its clear this movie is addressing the reality of black lives in the 1960s, south. Four little girls walking down their church steps, talking about things that these girls would most-likely be talking about and then the bomb goes off, and their pretty little shoes, their hair bows, their dresses, blown away like vapor. Their lives taken from them because of the brutal hatred for their black skin. This scene is followed by another very powerful scene with Oprah Winfrey attempting to gain her right to vote. We see how demeaning those voter registration tests were and it brought on the first of many tears in my eyes. Watching this movie, I had a cathartic cry. It was one of the most emotional tears I’ve ever shed, filled with pain and peace at the same time, I can’t describe it really but it was different. It was brought on by a scene where a black man trying to protect his mother and grand father was killed by police while protesting. I had to turn the movie off and just cry. This stuff really happened back then and it’s happening today, but why? Why are these senseless acts of violence so prevalent? Why is human life devalued so? Selma had an affect on me, and if you haven’t watched it as yet I encourage you to. Nothing that Martin Luther King did was in vein. He sacrificed his life so we could have the freedoms and liberties that we too often take advantage of.

Right now the movie is on Hulu, which is where I was able to watch it.

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Movie Monday:Why everyone should see Dear White People

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Sam White is a bi-racial student activist who has a radio show called Dear White People. She’s working hard to implement change at Winchester University, starting with her appointment to Head of the all black dorms Armstrong/Parker. A huge racial divide is brewing between the whites and the blacks at the school.

The movie simultaneously follows the lives of three other black students attending the university, including Coco, who comes off as an Uncle Tom, Troy Fairbanks who is the son of the school’s dean, and Lionel Higgins, who is the nerd, stereotyped and bullied mostly because of his sexuality. Sam and Lionel along with a group of other racially diverse students ultimately work together to ignite the biggest race war in their school’s history as a result of a racist Halloween party thrown by a popular student magazine.

This movie hit home for me in more ways than one. If you went to a PWI, then you know what it means to be an “other.” I spent a majority of my college career, but specifically my last two years feeling like an outsider. I just didn’t feel like I was in an environment that understood me. When I saw this movie, I felt like I wasn’t alone. Someone had to feel the same way to create such a real and culturally poignant movie for my generation. I say my generation; because this movie deals with the individual and institutional racism we encounter at the most prominent universities in America today. It also channels a modern day Spike Lee Joint. This movie isn’t an attack on White people but indepthly illustrates the experience of what it means to be black in America or in a smaller scope what it means to be black in a university where the majority is non-black.

Without giving too much away, I encourage you to watch for yourself. I found it on Hulu

 

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Movie Monday: What Happened, Miss Simone?

This choice is not necessarily a movie, more of a documentary but I enjoyed learning about the life and times of Nina Simone, one of the most influential singers my race has ever had. At the height of Nina Simone’s career she began to take part in the civil rights movement, which some say jeopardized her career because she became radical. What I loved about this documentary is that it humanizes Nina, and shows her vulnerabilities and quite frankly her demons with growing up in an American society that devalued her because of her blackness. Unlike many other entertainers, she couldn’t sit back idly and do nothing. She was very involved in the struggle.

If you have Netflix, please watch What Happened, Miss Simone?

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